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no more EDIE MANIA [09 May 2007|10:50am]

bigwindows
I am so happy and antcipate it. :)
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THE REAL EDIE SEDGWICK at the MOMI [08 Mar 2007|01:20pm]

sdpt

THE REAL EDIE SEDGWICK
MARCH 31-APRIL 8, 2007
The Museum of the Moving Image


Edie Sedgwick was downtown New York’s “It girl” of 1965, when she was inseparable from Andy Warhol; they were “the king of Pop and his star.” Sedgwick appeared in nearly all of Warhol’s films that year. “Edie was incredible on camera—just the way she moved,” said Warhol. “She was all energy. She didn’t know what to do with it when it came to living her life, but it was wonderful to film.”

All films are 16mm, and directed by Andy Warhol, unless noted. All films by Andy Warhol are from The Museum of Modern Art.


Poor Little Rich Girl
Saturday, March 31, 2:00 p.m.

1965, 67 mins. A two-reel documentary portrait; in the first reel, out of focus, Edie does her morning routine, applying make-up and exercising. The second reel, in focus, feels like a revelation: Edie smokes pot, tries on clothes, and talks with an off-screen Chuck Wein.


Restaurant
Saturday, March 31, 3:30 p.m.

1965, 34 mins. Edie Sedgwick and friends drink and talk as they await a meal.
Followed by Screen Test Reel #10 1964-6, 40 mins. This reel of Warhol's Factory screen tests includes Edie Sedgwick, Jane Holzer, Lou Reed, John Ashbery, Jonas Mekas, and Paul Morrissey.


Vinyl
Saturday, March 31, 5:00 p.m.

1965, 70 mins. Warhol's adaptation of A Clockwork Orange, filmed in a corner of the Factory, stars Gerard Malanga as Alex. But Edie Sedgwick, a non-speaking extra, steals the show.


Space
Saturday, March 31, 6:30 p.m.

1965, 70 mins. Warhol's constantly moving camera roams around its characters, in a mélange of talking, food fights, and folk singing.
Preceded by Match Girl 1966, 25 mins. Directed by Andrew Meyer. Sedgwick is mythologized by Vivian Kurz, who plays the self-destructive "Match Girl" in this allegorical film, narrated by Warhol.


Outer and Inner Space
Double-Screen Projection
Sunday, April 1, 3:00 p.m.and 6:00 p.m.

1965, 70 mins. In this split-screen extravaganza, Sedgwick smokes and speaks about subjects including outer space, medication, and her family while seated next to her image on a television monitor.
Preceded by Lupe 1965, 36 mins. Loosely based on the planned suicide of Lupe Velez, this film, presented in its original double-screen format, shows Sedgwick as she listens to music, dances, plays with a kitten, takes pills, and eats supper.


Kitchen
Saturday, April 7, 2:00 p.m.

1965, 70 mins. Sedgwick applies make-up, exercises her legs, is seduced by Mickey Trudeau, and discusses coffee. Written as a showcase for Sedgwick, Ronald Tavel's situational and episodic script was described by Warhol as "illogical, without motivation or character-completely ridiculous."
Preceded by Restaurant 1965, 34 mins. Edie Sedgwick and friends drink and talk as they await a meal.


Afternoon
Saturday, April 7, 4:00 p.m.

1965, 105 mins. Made from footage that was cut from Chelsea Girls at Edie Sedgwick's request, Afternoon is part of Warhol's intended "Poor Little Rich Girl" saga, along with Restaurant and Face.


Beauty #2
Saturday, April 7, 6:30 p.m.

1965, 70 mins. In her most complex, playful performance, Sedgwick flirts in bed with Gino Piserchio—and the camera—while responding to jealous insults from an off-screen Chuck Wein; Gerard Malanga looms by the bed, watching.
Preceded by Poem Posters 1967, 24 mins. Directed by Charles Henri Ford. Sedgwick is the life of the party in this priceless record of a star-studded art gallery opening, with appearances by William Burroughs, Jayne Mansfield, and Jack Smith.


Horse
Sunday, April 8, 4:30 p.m.

1965, 105 min. Sedgwick had a small part in this Western parody, her first Warhol film, which does indeed star a horse. The film is an important transition in Warhol's move towards ironic treatment of Hollywood genres.


Ciao! Manhattan
Sunday, April 8, 6:30 p.m.

1972, 84 mins. 35mm. Directed by John Palmer and David Weisman. Sedgwick died just weeks after making this quasi-biographical film, which combines footage from her Factory days with scenes of “Susan Superstar” looking back on the ruins of her life.
Preceded by fragment from Lulu 1967, 8 mins., video. Directed by Richard Leacock. U.S. Premiere. This expressionistic footage of Sedgwick was filmed for an opera.





source: http://www.movingimage.us/site/screenings/content/2007/edie_sedgwick.html
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[01 Mar 2007|08:34pm]

sdpt

Edie Sedgwick: http://www.myspace.com/ediemsedgwick
Edie Beale: http://www.myspace.com/bealesofgreygardens
source: NYTIMES
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[28 Feb 2007|11:09am]

bigwindows


A Look Back At Edie Sedgwick
All Access
The star of many of Andy Warhol’s underground films as well as a Vogue model, this is a look back at the life that was Edie Sedgwick.


http://video.accesshollywood.com/player/?id=62552

also, why do the moderator of this allow other groups and people to steal the thunder?
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A Walk into the Sea: Danny Williams and the Warhol Factory [13 Jan 2007|01:38am]

sdpt



A Walk into the Sea: Danny Williams and the Warhol Factory
Synopsis

In 1965, Danny Williams was living at a fast pace. He dropped out of Harvard against his family's wishes and moved to Manhattan to begin a film career. There he edited two films for Albert and David Maysles. He became a fixture at the Warhol Factory, fell in love with Andy Warhol and moved in with Andy and his mother. He also made over 20 films and designed the groundbreaking Velvet Underground/ Exploding Plastic Inevitable (EPI) light show.

1966 proved a more difficult year for Danny. Right before the EPI national tour, Warhol ended their affair. Three months away from New York and a growing dependence on amphetamines increased Danny's anxiety. After a Variety review called Danny the "mastermind" of the Exploding Plastic Inevitable show, Factory members accused him of trying to take credit for Warhol's work and maneuvered for his ouster.

After the tour ended in July, Danny went home to his family in Massachusetts. He brought with him a wooden box filled with amphetamine-fueled journals, lighting diagrams, personal effects and letters. His only other bag was a shaving kit filled with drugs.  After a family meal, he left in his mother’s car. He was never seen again.

Thirty-four years later, just after the turn of the millennium his niece, director Esther Robinson, took a job as Program Director at a foundation funded and housed by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Arts

One day that summer, her grandmother Nadia paid her a visit at work. On meeting the staff of the Warhol Foundation. Nadia casually mentioned that her son, Danny Williams, had lived with Warhol and his mother and then mysteriously disappeared. A stunned silence filled the room. Esther was urgently told: "You need to speak with Callie Angell right away."

While archiving the Warhol collection at the Museum of Modern Art, Ms. Angell had stumbled upon a strange set of 20 experimental silent films. Shot on 16 mm black-and-white stock, they featured Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick, The Velvet Underground and other well-known Warhol subjects. They were also dramatically different from Warhol's films; highly stylized, clearly personal, and quite obviously conceived by someone other than Warhol. They were all marked "Danny Williams," and, according to Ms. Angell, were "extraordinary."

Believing these films might hold the key to the mystery surrounding her uncle's abbreviated life, Esther asked MOMA to return them to her family. As she battled a resistant MOMA bureaucracy, she began researching her uncle's life in New York City. Frustrated by the scarcity of references to Danny in books about the 60's Warhol factory, Esther was intrigued when her grandmother gave her Danny's box of papers and journals. They were filled with clues about art-making and Factory infighting.

Curious about how little was said about Danny both by family and Factory members she began to make a film about her uncle's last year. In interviews with her family, she started to tease out the story behind his disappearance, his complex relationship to his family and their unspoken fears. When MoMA finally released the films, the footage was every bit as remarkable as promised: luminous, intimate, and revealing. A new question emerged: how was this young talent dropped from the historic record?

Esther then started tracking down and interviewing surviving Warhol Factory members. Surprisingly intimate, these interviews began to dismantle the mythmaking machine and allow a deeper examination of the human fragility on which the Warhol empire was built.

A Walk Into the Sea: Danny Williams and The Warhol Factory is the story of her search to uncover the facts behind her uncle's disappearance and tragically shortened life. It is the story of an extraordinary talent abandoned by two dysfunctional families; one upright and traditional, the other bohemian and legendary.  It is a story of abandonment by history itself. And it is a journey into a sea of family, missing histories, and the failings of memory. 


more at www.awalkintothesea.com

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[03 Jan 2007|12:18am]

pink_lyndsy
EDIE shoes :-)
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Miss-Selfridge-black-polka-dot-retro-sling-backs-size-3_W0QQitemZ330069551884QQihZ014QQcategoryZ53562QQcmdZViewItem
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Dylan: Flick Needs A-changin' [14 Dec 2006|04:03pm]

sdpt



December 14, 2006 -- BOB Dylan wants to send "Factory Girl" to the glue factory - charging the upcoming Edie Sedgwick biopic falsely suggests he was responsible for the Andy Warhol ingenue's suicide.

The famed folkie's pit bull lawyers have fired off a letter to producers Bob Yari and Holly Wiersma, and screenwriter Aaron Richard Golub, demanding the flick not be released - or even screened - until they see it to determine if Dylan, who they say has "deep concerns," has been defamed.

Sedgwick, played by Sienna Miller, was Warhol's brightest young star before spiraling into drug abuse and killing herself with an overdose of barbiturates in 1971. She got to know Dylan while living at the Chelsea Hotel, and legend has it they hooked up.

The original screenplay depicted the alleged relationship using Dylan's name, and suggested he dumped Sedgwick - which led to "her tragic decline into heroin addiction and eventual suicide," Dylan's lawyer, Orin Snyder, writes.

Although Dylan's name has been changed to "Danny Quinn" and the character is reportedly a composite of Dylan, Jim Morrison and Mick Jagger, Snyder says critics who've seen screenings say it's unmistakably Dylan. A trailer shows Quinn, played by Hayden Christensen, wearing Dylan's trademark harmonica brace and cap as he performs.

Snyder warns the filmmakers: "You appear to be laboring under the misunderstanding that merely changing the name of a character or making him a purported fictional composite will immunize you from suit. That is not so. Even though Mr. Dylan's name is not used, the portrayal remains both defamatory and a violation of Mr. Dylan's right of publicity . . .

"Until we are given an opportunity to view the film, we hereby demand that all distribution and screenings . . . immediately be ceased." The Weinstein Company, which is releasing the picture Dec. 27, had no comment. Neither did Yari or Golub.

Oddly, Lou Reed, who was part of the Warhol scene, is portrayed as "Lou Reed" by Brian Bell. But taciturn Reed isn't complaining - yet. 

source: http://www.nypost.com/gossip/pagesix/pagesix_u.htm

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Books books books (this is not an attack) [12 Dec 2006|10:46am]

sdpt
I have respect for people, but not for people like Nat Finkelstein, although he has captured some of the most beautiful Edie images.  I was excited to think, Nat Finkelstein a Warhol photographer was on livejounal and that he was creating a book about Edie with never-before published photos of her. BAM! What the hell was I thinking, he insulted me! I never insult anyone before having known why I should. I suggested to him, that he make a shirt using one of his iconic images of Edie - somehow he got insulted. I had seen him on the edie sedgwick livejournal (another tainting) and he insulted almost everyone there. He has tainted my love for Edie ever so that I can not buy the book he and David Dalton put together. Earlier this fall I got an email from an Edie Factory Girl person asking if I could help promote the book - How sad.


this is a review he did for David and Melissa's Edie: Girl on Fire book from Amazon:

girl burnt out, November 4, 2006 Reviewer: NATHAN FINKELSTEIN "photographer"


nothing really new except the ramblings of a drug addled exbeauty on her way to oblivion . Might be of interest to extreme Edieites and necrophiles . Basically the out takes of ciao manhattan upon further perusal I must swallow a bit of tongue ; it is ,actualy well put together ,a bit over stuffed ,perhaps but show great respect for the photography

these are reviews for his book Edie Factory Girl

DAZZLING - JUST LIKE EDIE, December 8, 2006
Reviewer:BILLY NAME "BILLY NAME" (billyname.com, NEW YORK, USA) - See all my reviews
it's difficult to assess in a literary manner a book about edie sedgwick, because like her life, all works about her come through as fragmented/torn in pieces/collage-type depictions. it's only because edie's life really was like such. i had the book for a week before i started to read it and associate the text with images. i think david dalton did an admirable job of capturing the nature of edie's lightning flash through life, in and out of warhol and dylan, icons of the era, because it was like that, david was a witness, as were the commentators in the book, including myself. the book layout is helter-skelter, and so was edie's life. love it or leave it, the book is a faithful impression. it's not for criticism, it's to have for a midnight snack before being unable to sleep. all in all i can say if you want a real taste of edie sedgewick in the mid-sixties, this is it. billy name.

This is a comment from Nat Finkelstein., December 9, 2006
Reviewer: NATHAN FINKELSTEIN "photographer"

I think that it is not at all coincidental that these bitter, derogatory and possibly libelous comments
all come from the same area in California? Be that as it may, the attacks upon me have nothing to do with reviewing the book itself.
A) I did not write the text. The text was written by David Dalton and (with her permission) excerpts from Jean Stein and George Plimpton.
B) Is a reviewer trying to claim that the photographs are not of Edie but oh maybe
Misha or a geneticaly engineered clone? No little man, they are the real Edie.
C) There are over 100 illustrations, many of which are never before published....although some thieves do violate my copyrights and some rip off my website.
Finally, the comment that I am a "bitter old man " is not only wrong but potentially slanderous. The truth is I am a happy man - I have a wife who loves me, money in the bank, two great dogs, rent paid and food on the table.....what more do I need ? Oh yes, I get laid. Can you say the same little ghosts?
P.S. I don't care what you say.......but spell my name right.

Initial post
This bitter old man was always despised at the Factory, was never really part of it, and is a poisonous human being. I'm the panel member who walked out; I felt that I was being contaminated by his evil spirit, just sitting next to him. I dare anyone but Nat Finkelstein himself to defend Nat Finkelstein.
Reply 

In reply to an earlier post
Dear Danny Fields,

What is YOUR damage? It seems to me (and hopefully to those so compulsive as to read these comments) that there is more than one BITTER OLD MAN in the room.

Congratulations on your hissy fit at The Strand......and a bewildered "WHAT FOR?" from the audience. Not getting enough attention, Mr Fields? Moreover, is a reference to disposable syringes really the "most disgusting" thing you've ever heard? With your publicized history, I can hardly imagine.

Nat Finkelstein was at the Factory......because ANDY wanted him there. Period. Nat (if you know his history) was a journalist with access to publicity, which ANDY had not yet received so much of in 1964-65.

Nat Finkelstein was NOT there because he was fascinated by amped up queens & witty put-downs. You will notice he has no photographs of you?

Finally, you dare anyone but Nat Finkelstein to defend him? You haven't yet dealt with MRS. Finkelstein. I am embarassed to be having this public discourse with you......but someone needs a proper dose of medicine, & it's not Nat. Take your psychopathy elsewhere.

As for evil spirits & poison people.....GROW UP.

And Danny, we think you doth protest too much.

-Elizabeth

first off i dont see why Danny Fields personal attack should be posted as a book review . But please allow me a word or two
in respose . As I have said in my prior comment I am a happy man but I wonder why being of age is such a fearfull state to some
people . I guess for some such as Danny what a drag it is growing old . Now some facts .When I entered the Factory it was as a photojournalist under the aegis of Black Star publishing specializing in counter culture ,civil rights and anti Veit Nam War Andy knew of my work because 1962 I published ,what was possibly the first nation wide article on ,what was to be called POP art .A 8 page spread on Claus Oldenberg .Andy gave me a shot and I immediatly placed an article in the London Observer which was followed by a two year collaboration which included The Dylan Screen test .The Ducamps visit ,the birth of the Velvet Underground
the Betsy Johnson Paraphenalia opening on and on culminating in a two man showing at the Cinemateque and The Andy Warhol Index . A complete body of collaborative work done while Danny and his coterie of ivy league trust fund drop outs engaged themselves in a sybaritic frenzy of amphetamine and self indulgence and at the same time enabling Edie in her own adictions
Now I never claimed to be 'one of them ' (who would ? ) I was a professional Journalist doing ,a job .The very word job was anathemic to the group . Allthough they did let Billy Name do the jobs for them .Was I universaly despised ? Well maybe be some of the neer de well tr4st fund junkies...after all I was doing what they talked about doing but never got around to .But do you think
Andy would have suffered the presence of some one he despised for two and a half years Did Edie ;look at the photos .Bibbe who took shelter in my home when she ran away from home .and as far as Nat Finkelstein defending himself .Tell me where Danny boy tell me when
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screen tests [01 Dec 2006|12:14am]

smokeandwallow
Edie was a filmmaker, a collaborator and artist with other underground and experimental filmmakers at a time when making a non-Hollywood film was almost a revolutionary act. Like you she was young at a time when a wave of technological advancements– new video camera, audio recorders and film cameras– were putting power in the hands of the people to tell their own stories. This is a pursuit she believed in fiercely. She said often to fellow adventurers in her filmmaking pursuits, “It must be real, if it isn’t real, there is no movie.” On the eve of the release of a HIGHLY fictionalized Hollywood account of Edie’s life, we hope you will join us in our Internet and video experiment of making real screen tests of real people. WE know you can tell the difference, as she would have wanted, between what is real and what is not.

-Melissa Painter

“I do love Alice in Wonderland though. That’s something I think I could do very well. Don’t you think we ought to do an A.W.? A.W.’s Alice in Wonderland? Andy Warhol’s Alice in Wonderland? A.W. stands for a lot of things, I understand. It, uh, it would make a fantastic film. So I wanted somebody to write the script for it, in a modern sense. Think it would be the most marvelous movie in the world. If it could be done. Don’t you think? Really I don’t think they’ve done one since they did a Walt Disney one- which isn’t really doing it. In a sense it is, but not in the way it really should be done. What’s needed right now is a real scene. I mean not just cartoon characters but the actual character of people because there’s so many fantastic people that you might as well use the people.”

– EDIE 1965

“To be an underground filmmaker… one felt that you were engaged in forbidden activity, which of course lead us to Andy and 47th St and the factory because Andy was hosting this whole feeling of rebellion in image where we could all participate in doing things that were ridiculous and absurd…and so to get a bunch of people who all feel that the sky’s the limit to start being able to do crazy ridiculous image with Andy…

[John, what did it feel like to be in a movie that Warhol directed?] Well, it felt like you were talking your pants of. It was embarrassing. You wondered what were you doing? Why are you doing this? And yet at the same time you knew… You didn’t know then, but to think about it now, I mean imagine you are there and there’s a hundred million dollars worth of art lying around on the floor, and these people fooling around with cameras. Andy, and I’m there with him doing the same thing, and there’s Edie, and we’re all there doing this. And so on the one hand there’s the rebellion, because you know you’re not supposed to, and on the other hand you know that its really really important, and yet its just going to disapear. So that was a peculiar feeling. ”

-John Palmer
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Factory Girl photos [27 Nov 2006|09:05pm]

sdpt
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Miller's Crossing [12 Nov 2006|05:40pm]

sdpt
After getting more notice for her offscreen drama with Jude Law than her onscreen roles, Sienna Miller hopes her performance in the upcoming ''Factory Girl'' finally will put her talent front and center by Dave Karger

EDIE DOES IT With her performance as Sedgwick, audiences finally may see Miller as more than gossip-page fodder
EDIE DOES IT With her performance as Sedgwick, audiences finally may see Miller as more than gossip-page fodder

Quick: Name a movie Sienna Miller has been in.

Drawing a blank? Don't feel bad — only three (Layer Cake, Alfie, and Casanova) have been released in the U.S., and none of them have grossed more than $14 million at the box office.

Okay, now name a scandal Sienna Miller has been in. A bit easier, right? There's the one where her fiancé, Jude Law, cheated on her with the nanny. There's that interview she did from the set of her upcoming drama The Mysteries of Pittsburgh in which she referred to that city as ''S---sburgh.'' And there's that supposed fit she threw after a bouncer denied her admission to a watering hole last month — that one really gets her goat. Sitting in a downtown New York café, Miller knows she's supposed to take the high road, but she can't help it. ''I would like to clear up that I never, ever, ever had a tantrum outside a bar, screaming 'I am a famous actress,' '' Miller says, good-humored but clearly exasperated. ''I have 10 witnesses to vouch that I calmly left.''

Ah, the plight of a tabloid mascot. Largely because of others' actions, Miller, 24, has become the British Lindsay Lohan, a promising young performer whose talent has been obscured by her flair for fashion and train wreck of a personal life. ''It would be nice to be respected as an actress because I take my job very seriously,'' she says. ''But there isn't a huge body of work to look at. Hopefully, as that builds up, people will start ignoring the lies.''

That could happen with the Dec. 29 release of Factory Girl, in which Miller plays Edie Sedgwick, the privileged socialite who became one of Andy Warhol's favorite muses in the mid-'60s before developing a drug addiction that led to her death at age 28. ''I didn't know anything about Sienna at all — it was before the whole Jude/Nannygate thing,'' says Factory Girl director George Hickenlooper, who picked Miller's head shot out of a lineup and soon learned that she and Sedgwick had some surface similarities. ''They both come from elegant backgrounds, they both have a sense of originality in terms of style, and they both have a real vulnerability.'' Once she landed the part, she dug deeper than she ever had for a role. ''The more I read — and I read everything — the more I became really intrigued by her,'' says Miller, who was born in New York to an American father and South African mother but grew up in London. ''I know I couldn't have done any more. I couldn't have learned any more, studied any more, given any more emotionally.'' (Not to mention physically: To replicate Sedgwick's scratchy, singsong voice, Miller says she ''was coughing and screaming before takes.'')

Because Factory was a low-budget indie, filming in sequence was out of the question. ''My most emotional scene was my second day. I was just terrified,'' Miller recalls of Sedgwick's final confrontation with Warhol (played by Guy Pearce). ''But it was good to feel in flux and thrown around because the one thing I really wanted to capture was that she always looked terrified no matter what. So real fear was good. There was an awful lot to do, but as an actor, I can't imagine that it gets any better.''

It's certainly more appealing than outrunning a horde of paparazzi. Miller says that at the height of Nannygate, she even considered abandoning acting altogether. ''I felt like, if this is the sacrifice I have to make, it can't be worth it,'' says Miller, who speaks about Law as if they're back together (though, if you care, on this late October afternoon, her engagement ring is nowhere to be seen). ''I have to be able to go to a park and walk my dogs. I don't want security guards. If acting meant I couldn't leave my house without 10 men chasing me, then there's no point. I could be equally happy knitting in the country.''

If she's feeling better now, it's because she has spent the past year immersed in work. Since last December, Miller has shot five films, including the two-person drama Interview with Steve Buscemi, the dark honeymoon comedy Camille with James Franco, and the fantasy Stardust with Robert De Niro. Will she finally win acclaim for her professional achievements? The answer may come in the form of award nominations or future offers. And if all goes well, Miller may experience the difference in how she's recognized on the street. ''People say, 'You have great style,' or they get really personal and try to give me relationship advice, which is strange,'' she says with a shrug. ''But no one really says, 'I loved you in that film.' That would be a refreshing change.''

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1960s 'It' girl catches fire in a new era [08 Nov 2006|10:11am]

sdpt
By Carol Memmott, USA TODAY



Edie Sedgwick, "It" girl of Andy Warhol's infamous '60s Factory scene, is the "It" girl of the new millennium, inspiring fashion, books, movies and online communities.

New fans of the neo-glam model/junkie, noted for her cropped platinum hair and heavy black eye makeup, are fascinated by her edgy glamour and rebellious life. (ugh... and she's quickly going out of style)

Socialite Sedgwick turned her back on her Boston Brahmin family to become part of New York's art scene. She was Warhol's muse and is said to have inspired Bob Dylan's Just Like a Woman and Like a Rolling Stone. Sedgwick died of a drug overdose in 1971. She was 28.

"I think there is something about Edie that touches on the reckless side in all of us," says Melissa Painter, co-author with David Weisman of Edie: Girl on Fire (Chronicle Books, $50), a visual biography in stores this week.

Weisman was co-director of the underground cult classic Ciao! Manhattan starring Sedgwick and other Factory celebs.

Girl on Fire comes with an audio CD of Sedgwick's last interviews. A documentary is expected to be ready for spring film festivals.

Factory Girl, George Hickenlooper's biopic starring Sienna Miller, will have a brief Oscar-qualifying run starting Dec. 29 and open nationwide early next year.

Also sparking Edie mania:

•Edie Factory Girl by photographer Nat Finkelstein and writer David Dalton (VH1, $29.95, in stores). Bio/photo book by two who were part of the scene.

•In recent months, Teen Vogue and Seventeen have included articles on how to create the Edie look.

•Delias.com is selling an Edie Dress and a Factory Girl tote bag.

•Urban Outfitters carries a Ciao! Manhattan T-shirt, tunic, tote bag and notepad with her image.

•MAC and Smashbox Cosmetics created lines this year inspired by her mod look.

Fashion Wire Daily recently reported designer Karl Lagerfeld's upcoming collection has "echoes" of Sedgwick's style with models sporting heavy eyeliner and fringed straight blond hair.

•Kung Fu Nation has been selling out of its Edie T-shirts sold at KungFuNation.com, Urban Outfitters and Hot Topic.

•In January, In My Blood: Six Generations of Madness and Desire in an American Family by cousin John Sedgwick (uncle of actress Kyra Sedgwick) will be published by HarperCollins. It chronicles, in part, Edie's rapid rise to fame, heroin addiction and death by overdose.

•Edie is an online phenom. "A lot of kids are finding her, and a lot of people are creating online communities," says Ben Allgood, 22, creative director for Edienation.com and myspace.com/ediegirlonfire.

He estimates more than 300 fan-driven websites, more than 200 profiles on MySpace and a dozen full-fledged groups are devoted to her. Says Allgood: "This number is growing rapidly as Edie awareness is rising." (can't be serious...)

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Edie in Interview [26 Oct 2006|08:03pm]

sdpt

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Edie Nation [15 Oct 2006|02:13pm]

sdpt
check out www.edienation.com

 
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Sienna/ Edie news [22 Sep 2006|01:59pm]

sdpt

Mother put a stop to obsessed Miller

Friday September 22, 11:30 AM

 

Sienna Miller became so emotionally involved playing tragic Andy Warhol muse Edie Sedgwick, her worried mother insisted she take time off to sort herself out.

The actress admits she found it difficult letting go of her character once filming on Factory Girl had finished - until her mum stepped in.

Miller says, "She said, 'You've got to stop this now.'

"I took myself off to Mexico on my own for a week and just chilled out, but it was several more weeks before Edie escaped my system. I still think there's still a bit of her in me."

 

Oscar push for Sienna in Warhol film

By BAZ BAMIGBOYE Last updated at 10:53am on 22nd September 2006

 

Sienna Miller has bought her first house in London, after spending the past 12 months living out of suitcases in hotels and rented apartments the length and breadth of America.

"I'll be an independent girl," the actress told me, agreeing she needed a place separate from whoever may be sharing her life.

The move to her own property will be delayed, though, till after she completes her latest picture, The Mysteries Of Pittsburgh, her fifth movie this year, later next month.

But then she has to finish post-production work on another film, Factory Girl, about tragic style icon Edie Sedgwick and her relationship with Andy Warhol.

The small-budget independent picture could become an important boost to Sienna's acting career. Those who have seen early rough-cut versions tell me the performances of Sienna and leading man Guy Pearce, as Warhol, are brilliant. So much so that studio chief Harvey Weinstein plans a year end Oscar campaign for them.

By that time, Sienna hopes to be ensconced in her new home. "When I was last in London, I was feeling like I should be back in a hotel room, and that's when you know it's time to stop for a little bit," she said.

Certainly, playing Edie Sedgwick took its toll. "The more I delved into her, the more I realised she'd had this traumatic life," Sienna, left as Sedgwick, told me, explaining how her childhood was an emotional nightmare.

She was popping Valium at eight, had electric shock treatment at 14, and was sexually abused by her father. "You can see why she went so wild," Sienna noted, alluding to Sedgwick's s society antics in Sixties New York.

The actress, 24, was fascinated by Sedgwick, spending the best part of a year researching her life, and admits she became "totally obsessed" with the model-turned-muse.

"I found it really hard to take my black tights off," she joked, referring to Sedgwick's trademark nylons But then, more seriously, she added: "Actually, I didn't want to let her go."

Finally, though, Sienna's mother told her to pull herself together. "She said: 'You've got to stop this now.' I took myself off to Mexico co on my own for a week and just chilled out, but it was several more weeks before Edie escaped my system. I think there's still aa bit of her in me."

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Andy Documentary [21 Sep 2006|11:39am]

sdpt

Andy Warhol is for the 21st Century what Vincent van Gogh was for the 20th, a viewer magnet who can be counted on to attract attention as much for his life as his art.Andy Warhol is for the 21st Century what Vincent van Gogh was for the 20th, a viewer magnet who can be counted on to attract attention as much for his life as his art.

Almost 20 years after his death, the assumption of those who sell Warhol -- dealers, curators, critics, gay studies instructors and all the other barnacles that have attached themselves since the 1960s -- is remarkably the same as when he was living: Audiences are so hungry for him that they can be fed anything, regardless of measure or credibility.

"Andy Warhol: A Documentary Film," the four-hour, two-part essay by Ric Burns airing at 9 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday on WTTW-Ch. 11, is the latest immoderate portrait. "Genius" and money are mentioned more often than in any other art documentary, and unlike previous installments in PBS' "American Masters" series, this one goes so far that it compares its subject to Jesus and declares his work to be about transubstantiation.

All histories of contemporary art acknowledge that Warhol helped cause a radical shift in taste, from the macho, inward-looking work of the Abstract Expressionists to a fey preoccupation with appearance. His obsessions with celebrity and money also had a powerful and, as it has turned out, lasting influence on artists' views of their profession. But for the people involved with the documentary this is not enough.

The importance of everything Warhol created -- commercial art, paintings, sculptures, films, music/light shows, his studio/salon called the Factory -- is here inflated to bursting. And even revelations that the ideas for several of his most famous pieces as well as the styles in which he created them originated with others are submitted as signs of his "genius."

Warhol himself speaks little in the production, and when he does, both the dazed manner and frivolous content tend to work against his canonization. So performance artist Laurie Anderson gravely intones Burns and co-writer James Sanders' effusions -- the Factory is "the most radical, ambiguous and troubling work of art he ever made" -- as art folk naturally given to hyperbole provide a swooning chorus to more serious Warhol observations delivered in a grating vocal impersonation by con artist Jeff Koons.

Episode 1 traces Warhol's bleak Pittsburgh childhood and rise from poverty to the highest reaches of New York commercial illustration and, ultimately the apotheosis of camp in his Pop Art. If you can stomach hearing he wanted to be Lana Turner as well as Zeus hurling thunderbolts, this is worth watching for vintage art-world footage. Episode 2 is mostly a creep show chronicling his destructive milieu, the fate of Warhol "superstars" such as Edie Sedgwick, a virtual minute-by-minute reconstruction of his shooting by man-hating hustler Valerie Solanas plus breathless assessments of his films and meretricious later paintings.

The large team of producers included Donald Rosenfeld, who worked on excellent documentaries of Eugene O'Neill and William Eggleston, but also art dealer Larry Gagosian, who has featured Warhol in 30 exhibitions, with one about to open, and designer Diane von Furstenberg, who soon will issue a limited-edition phone based on her likeness in a Warhol portrait.

The artist's final words onscreen are: "I wanted really, really to be a tap dancer. I should have stuck with it. It would have been so great." Perhaps it also would have prompted from filmmakers more truth in advertising.


Almost 20 years after his death, the assumption of those who sell Warhol -- dealers, curators, critics, gay studies instructors and all the other barnacles that have attached themselves since the 1960s -- is remarkably the same as when he was living: Audiences are so hungry for him that they can be fed anything, regardless of measure or credibility.

"Andy Warhol: A Documentary Film," the four-hour, two-part essay by Ric Burns airing at 9 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday on WTTW-Ch. 11, is the latest immoderate portrait. "Genius" and money are mentioned more often than in any other art documentary, and unlike previous installments in PBS' "American Masters" series, this one goes so far that it compares its subject to Jesus and declares his work to be about transubstantiation.

All histories of contemporary art acknowledge that Warhol helped cause a radical shift in taste, from the macho, inward-looking work of the Abstract Expressionists to a fey preoccupation with appearance. His obsessions with celebrity and money also had a powerful and, as it has turned out, lasting influence on artists' views of their profession. But for the people involved with the documentary this is not enough.

The importance of everything Warhol created -- commercial art, paintings, sculptures, films, music/light shows, his studio/salon called the Factory -- is here inflated to bursting. And even revelations that the ideas for several of his most famous pieces as well as the styles in which he created them originated with others are submitted as signs of his "genius."

Warhol himself speaks little in the production, and when he does, both the dazed manner and frivolous content tend to work against his canonization. So performance artist Laurie Anderson gravely intones Burns and co-writer James Sanders' effusions -- the Factory is "the most radical, ambiguous and troubling work of art he ever made" -- as art folk naturally given to hyperbole provide a swooning chorus to more serious Warhol observations delivered in a grating vocal impersonation by con artist Jeff Koons.

Episode 1 traces Warhol's bleak Pittsburgh childhood and rise from poverty to the highest reaches of New York commercial illustration and, ultimately the apotheosis of camp in his Pop Art. If you can stomach hearing he wanted to be Lana Turner as well as Zeus hurling thunderbolts, this is worth watching for vintage art-world footage. Episode 2 is mostly a creep show chronicling his destructive milieu, the fate of Warhol "superstars" such as Edie Sedgwick, a virtual minute-by-minute reconstruction of his shooting by man-hating hustler Valerie Solanas plus breathless assessments of his films and meretricious later paintings.

The large team of producers included Donald Rosenfeld, who worked on excellent documentaries of Eugene O'Neill and William Eggleston, but also art dealer Larry Gagosian, who has featured Warhol in 30 exhibitions, with one about to open, and designer Diane von Furstenberg, who soon will issue a limited-edition phone based on her likeness in a Warhol portrait.

The artist's final words onscreen are: "I wanted really, really to be a tap dancer. I should have stuck with it. It would have been so great." Perhaps it also would have prompted from filmmakers more truth in advertising.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The PBS here doesn't show it until 2:00am in the morning. I missed the first episode.


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Teen Vogue wants you to have a Factory party! [18 Sep 2006|03:47pm]

sdpt
Can you believe this? Is this the  exemplar of Edie that we want? This is embarrasing... when I look at this - I think of the members of the EDIE_SEDGWICK LJ community. (I just can't help it.)

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[04 Sep 2006|04:43pm]

sdpt
Another Sedgwick, Another 15 Minutes of `Madness'
By GAYLE FEE; LAURA RAPOSA; ERIN HAYES

Cambridge scribe John Sedgwick, cousin of '60s icon Edie and uncle of "The Closer" Kyra, likens his latest good fortune to a Patriot missile hitting its target.

"Remember how Raytheon was shooting off those Patriot missiles and how ridiculous the odds were that it was going to hit its target," asked the author. "Well, I hit one."

Sedgwick's latest book, "In My Blood: Six Generations of Madness and Desire in an American Family" will be published by Harper Collins in February - just weeks after George Hickenlooper's Edie Sedgwick biopic, "Factory Girl," starring Sienna Miller, opens nationwide.

Edie, a well-bred socialite who fled Radcliffe only to find sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll in the Apple with Andy Warhol, emerged as an iconic figure who became famous for defining the '60s with the silver-wigged artiste.

"She captivated people's attention because of her beauty and stylishness," said Sedgwick, adding that she also became a muse of singer Bob Dylan. "Emptiness worked for her. And she was the repository of other people's dreams.

"Andy saw her and valued her for all the things she thought were pathetic and ridiculous, like her good breeding, background, her asthetic sense and being a boarding school girl," he said. "Warhol, as Edie's mother would have said, was largely a social climber."

Edie, who was part of Warhol's inner circle that gathered at The Factory on East 47th Street, symbolized all the high fashion, rampant sexuality and drug-taking that defined the era, said the author.

Sedgwick chronicles his cousin's rapid rise to fame and descent into heroin addiction in the latter half of his book. She died of an apparent suicidal overdose at age 28 in 1971.

Next month, Hickenlooper, who is filming in Louisiana, is expected to come to Boston to shoot some opening scenes for his flick. And he's asked that Sedgwick and his 15-year-old daughter visit the local set, the author told the Track.

"That was my only condition," he laughed. "He's my new best friend, you know."

(c) 2006 Boston Herald. Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning. All rights Reserved.


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Edie and Nat article in Z!NK [31 Aug 2006|01:21pm]

sdpt
A four page article on Edie Sedgwick, including photos by Nat Finkelstein and David Weisman, appears in the September 2006 issue of Zink magazine.

The article, "Golden Girl," written by Keira Coplin, explores the continuing appeal of Andy Warhol and mentions the upcoming publication of both Nat Finkelstein's new book on Edie, Edie: Factory Girl and David Weisman's book Edie: Girl on Fire. According to the article, Weisman's book will include a CD of "previously unheard, last interviews."

George Hickenlooper, the director of Factory Girl, is also quoted, referring to Edie Sedgwick as "an icon of dysfunction in American culture," and notes that "Odds were stacked against us getting this movie made. It's like there's been some divine intervention. Maybe the stars are aligned."

Zink magazine is available at selected art/fashion mag outlets or from their website at www.zinkmag.com.

I went to Zinkmag.com and found this picture of Sienna Miller as Edie in 'Factory Girl.'


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buh [24 Aug 2006|03:13pm]

sdpt
Here is a scan from Fashion Rocks magazine, Fall 2006:

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